All change at BMC Surgery

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New section structure aims to better serve the surgical field.

At BMC Surgery, we recognise that change can be a good thing.

A few years ago, we made a major change to the way in which we handle manuscripts by appointing a group of academic Section Editors to drive the editorial assessment of new submissions according to the subject area of the study. Under this system, all manuscripts are assessed and managed through the peer-review process by expert academic Section Editors in consultation with a group of subject-specific Associate Editors. This allows for a detailed assessment of the science behind a manuscript early in the peer-review process, and means that expert reviewers can be identified quickly by professionals who themselves …

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Highlights of the BMC-series: April 2014

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BMCWordle

A history of lions • Genetics of strawberry flavor • Mechanisms of bacterial adherence • Fossil snakefly •  Surveillance leads to rabies reduction • Masculinity and marital violence • Lifestyle medicine for depression

Evolutionary Biology: A history of lions

Mitochondrial DNA from museum-preserved lion specimens, including the extinct Barbary lion (Panthera leo leo) and Iranian lion (P. l. persica), as well as lions from West and Central Africa were sequenced and data analysed spanning the historical range of lions. Integrating analysis of mitochondrial DNA from both modern and extinct populations suggests that lions migrated from Africa into Asia more recently than previously thought. The paper highlights that currently the only two lion conservation units recognised by International …

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BMC Pediatrics is attending the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting…

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This year, the annual Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) meeting is being held in Vancouver, British Columbia from Saturday May 2nd to Tuesday May 6th, and BMC Pediatrics will be attending. PAS is the largest conference focusing on child health, and brings together researchers and clinicians from all areas of child health, with approximately 3800 presenting their work.

 

The Executive Editor of BMC Pediatrics, Peter O’Donovan, will be there so please feel free to get in touch with him if you would like to meet. We would be delighted to hear about your work, the current state of your field of research, or ways in which you can get involved with the journal– including the possibility of joining …

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Better off together: BSCB-BSDB joint conference

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Last month saw the annual joint Spring conference of the annual British Society of Cell Biology and British Society of Developmental Biology at the University of Warwick. BMC Cell Biology and BMC Developmental Biology were lucky enough to attend.

As is often the case, although a national conference it attracted a diverse range of speakers and delegates from across Europe and beyond, while still maintaining the friendly atmosphere of a small conference.

As a joint conference both subjects were split equally, leading to a diverse range of talks. These including the excellent plenary talks Kai Simons on raft structures within cell membranes and from Janet Rossant, talking about the contribution of the trophectoderm layer of …

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Meet the Editor: BMC Hematology at BSH14

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BMC Hematology

This year the British Society for Haematology’s Annual Meeting is being held in Birmingham, UK, and BMC Hematology will be there. The program will cover all aspects of hematology, and promises to be an extremely interesting conference.

If you would like to meet to discuss your work, the current state of your field, publishing in BMC Hematology, or if you are interested in working with the journal as a member of our Editorial Board, then please feel free to contact Executive Editor Peter O’Donovan, who would be more than happy to meet.

Hope to see you in Birmingham!

Metagenomics: tools, comparisons and many applications

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We take a look back at recent developments in the fast-paced field of metagenomics – and look forward to what the future has in store

The term metagenomics first appeared in a publication in 1998 and according to Wikipedia ‘…is the study of metagenomes, genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples‘, and involves the sequencing of  many individual microorganism genomes from those samples. This is in contrast to clonal (single, pure) microbial  cultures which are commonly used for sequencing in microbial genomics and microbiology.

Metagenomics is an increasingly important area of research in genomics and other related fields. Diverse applications and new software developments continue to be made to improve the identification of mixed cultures of micro-organisms in both unusual and common …

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BMC Nursing – looking forwards, looking back

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jdlasica on flicker, Creative Commons

BMC Nursing announces a new Editorial Board of distinguished Section Editors

BMC Nursing is proud of the progress it has made since its launch back in 2001. The journal has grown steadily each year, continuing as a preeminent open access journal in its field.

Nursing practice is both a science and an art. It requires scientific skill yet demands a strong background in the social sciences and humanities. Anyone who has had to spend any length of time in a hospital or healthcare environment will undoubtedly be aware that nursing makes a significant contribution to the health maintenance, health promotion and well-being of individuals, local communities and populations. However, a major challenge for current and future nursing practice, education and …

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Ancient DNA reveals the lion’s past and (perhaps) future

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Kbhargava, Wikipedia, CC 3.0

The evolutionary history of lions is opaque, as most of the sub-species that once roamed the Old World are now extinct. However new research, published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, uses ancient DNA from extinct lions to piece together the gaps in their history. The findings provide both a new understanding of the lion’s past and may provide new insight into how to conserve what remain for the future.

Lions once roamed across the world. Until relatively recently, various sub-species could be found across Africa and all the way from the Indian subcontinent, through the Middle East and into modern day Greece and Turkey. Visitors to the British Museum in London can see engravings from Assyria (in modern day …

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Uncovering the secrets of the cryptic bushbabies

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Bushbaby_Wegmann_Wikimedia_cc

The charmingly named bushbabies (or galagos, from the family name Galagidae) are famously large-eyed nocturnal primates, native to continental Africa. An intriguing family, the Galagidae contains one of the smallest living primates, Galagoides rondoensis, weighing in at ~60g but it is also home to some species that can grow as large as a domestic cat. Galagos are capable jumpers, feeding on a range of foods as diverse as insects and gum and are known to live in a variety of different social hierarchies. Yet their nocturnal habits and often remote habitats mean that they are the least well-studied of all the primates and still relatively little is known of the biology of this enigmatic species.

The species …

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Highlights of the BMC-series: March 2014

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BMCWordle

• Great tits hide their success • Soccer surface injury risk • Can students afford to specialise? • Cognitive enhancement in the healthy? • Coffee can help! • Nanoscale chromatin changes precede cancer • Liver transplant of inverted organs •

Evolutionary biology: Great tits hide their success

Pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) have been shown to derive fitness benefits (measured as number of eggs laid) when nesting in close proximity to great tits (Parus major), presumably because they are able to obtain information about what makes a good nesting site. New experimental evidence also suggests that great tits actively cover their eggs as a counter-adaptation to this ‘information parasitism’, a tactic that …

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