Announcing the launch of Journal of Congenital Cardiology

BioMed Central launches Journal of Congenital Cardiology. We talk to Associate Editor, Dr Martin Lowe about the journal and current research trends in the field.

We are pleased to announce the launch of Journal of Congenital Cardiology, a new open access, international journal, covering all aspects of congenital cardiology from fetal life to old age and across the specialisms from basic science to long term outcomes.

The Journal of Congenital Cardiology presents an exciting opportunity for authors in the field of congenital heart disease to publish their data in an open access journal and have it peer reviewed.


Dr Martin Lowe
Barts Heart Centre

The journal is overseen by the Editor-in-Chief, Dr Graham Stuart (Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and Bristol Heart Institute) and is supported by a distinguished Editorial Board.

For further information on Journal of Congenital Cardiology, please visit the journal ‘About’ page or read the launch Editorial: ‘Journal of Congenital Cardiology – new, innovative and custom-made for congenital heart disease’

To keep up-to-date with the latest articles published in this exciting new journal, please sign-up for article alerts!

We asked Associate Editor, Dr Martin Lowe (Barts Heart Centre), for more on the journal and current research trends in the field:

Tell us about your background and current research interests?

I am an adult and paediatric heart rhythm specialist, specialising in the treatment of arrhythmias with catheter ablation and pacemaker / defibrillator implantation. Having qualified from St George’s Hospital, London, I trained in London and Cambridge, before undertaking a research fellowship at The Mayo Clinic, USA. I am currently Clinical Director for Cardiac Electrophysiology at the Barts Heart Centre, London, and Honorary Consultant at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London.

My current research interests include catheter ablation strategies in those with arrhythmias accompanying cardiomyopathy or congenital heart disease, risk stratification in patients and families predisposed to sudden cardiac death, and multisite pacing in heart failure patients.

As an Editorial Board Member, what does this new journal bring to the field of congenital cardiology?

Congenital cardiology is a highly specialised field in which a growing number of patients require expert advice and intervention. Our congenital patients benefit for a multispecialty approach with input from cardiology, cardiac imaging, heart rhythm service and interventional cardiologists. The new journal provides an opportunity to bring together experts from all these areas to help improve patient treatment.

What challenges are there in the field currently?

Surgical outcomes are impressive given the complexity of many patients heart anatomy, but despite this many patients develop arrhythmias – a rapid heartbeat, which is troublesome and may be life threatening. The treatments we have for heart rhythm problems, which centre around ablation (cauterising abnormal heart tissue), may not provide long lasting success and often needs to be repeated. Likewise balloon based valve treatment may not provide long lasting benefit in many patients, who will require further open heart surgery with all the risks associated with this.

What do you think the future holds for the field and the Journal of Congenital Cardiology?

The Journal of Congenital Cardiology presents an exciting opportunity for authors in the field of congenital heart disease to publish their data in an open access journal and have it peer reviewed. The rapidly expanding field of congenital cardiology would benefit form a dedicated journal with an opportunity for experts from all areas to discuss innovative approaches to investigation and treatment. Submissions would be welcomed from all researchers in the field. To submit your manuscript, visit the journal website today!

Dr Martin Lowe
Associate Editor of Journal of Congenital Cardiology
Consultant Cardiologist
Clinical Director Cardiac Electrophysiology
Barts Heart Centre

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