Monthly Archives: June 2018

The effect of marijuana on pain response to traumatic injury

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There is anecdotal evidence to suggest marijuana users require more medication to manage acute pain, but does the science back this up? A pilot study published today in Patient Safety in Surgery, found that in 261 patients, marijuana users required significantly more narcotics for pain control than non-marijuana users. Here to talk about the study and the medical use of marijuana is author of the article, Kristin Salottolo.

Medicine

Using social media in medicine to your advantage, with care!

Smart phone/stethoscope

Social media is beginning to change the way that medicine is practiced. It has the power to engage people in public health and policy discussions, establish professional networks and facilitate patients’ access to information about health and services. In this third and final blog post on social media in anesthesiology and critical care, the authors explain why social media is now such a key resource for physicians and offer advice on how to use it as safely and effectively as possible.

Part 1: Social media in critical care: what’s all the fuss about?

Part 2: Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM): the new way to keep up-to-date

 

Medicine Open Access Technology

Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM): the new way to keep up-to-date

Open access

FOAM is described as a dynamic collection of resources and tools for lifelong learning in medicine, as well as being a community and an ethos. In this blog, the second of a series of three on social media in critical care and anesthesiology, the authors discuss the FOAM resources available to physicians and whether, ultimately, FOAM could even replace peer review.

Part 1: Social media in critical care: what’s all the fuss about?

Part 3: Using social media in medicine to your advantage, with care!

Medicine Open Access Technology
1

Social media in critical care: what’s all the fuss about?

Social Media

The way we communicate and learn has been revolutionized by technology. Almost all of us carry a smartphone these days, so we are never more than a phone call, message or text away from family, friends and colleagues. This blog is the first of three from the authors examining how social media (SoMe) transgresses the usual borders and may, in the future, play an important role in communication, learning, teaching and peer review in anesthesia and critical care.
Part 2: Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM): the new way to keep up-to-date
 

Part 3: Using social media in medicine to your advantage, with care!

Medicine Open Access Technology
1