Monthly Archives: March 2017

You are what you eat… and drink

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With the abundance of new findings on the effects of various foods on our health, how shall we select the best quality evidence and recommendations to follow? Here, we summarize recent studies published in BMC Medicine, which provide evidence on the effects of various nutritional modifications on health outcomes.

Medicine

Brain Awareness Week 2017 Quiz

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Brain Awareness Week is a worldwide campaign to improve public awareness of what is being done in brain research, and how this will benefit us. BioMed Central is proud to present this quiz on neuroanatomy; how much do you know about the architecture of your brain?

Biology Medicine
1

Making Headway with Traumatic Brain Injury

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The brain is one of the most complex organs in the human body, controlling everything from the way we think and behave to how we move. Brain injury can have far-reaching consequences, but around the world millions of researchers are working to stop it in its tracks. In support of Brain Awareness Week (BAW), the ISRCTN registry is taking a look at some of the latest clinical trials making headway on limiting the damage of brain damage.

Health Medical Evidence Medicine
1

Using EEG to identify attention disorders

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Attention disorders are prevalent in 5% of the total population and are commonly diagnosed on the basis of a patient’s clinical history and an examination aided by symptom check sheets. A new study published in BMC Medicine finds that EEGs (electroencephalograms) can reliably detect specific brain differences associated with attentional disorders that are not observed in control subjects. Here to tell us more is lead author of the study, Frank Duffy.

Medicine

The need for child-centric reporting guides for pediatric clinical trial and systematic review protocols and reports

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Systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs) of clinical trial results are regarded as the highest level of medical evidence to establish the effectiveness and safety of interventions in a comprehensive, transparent, and reproducible nature. Unfortunately, evidence shows that not all SRs and trials are guaranteed to have been performed with the necessary methodological rigor. A study published today in Systematic Reviews reports on evidence of incomplete child-centric reporting details. Here the authors tell us more.

Medical Evidence Medicine