The Global Hunger Event, the Olympics and two recent additions to the BioMed Central journal portfolio

Over the last few weeks the world’s eyes have been on London. Athletes from around the globe have been striving to achieve their ultimate potential in the sporting events they’ve trained to their limits for.

Among the research published in Extreme Physiology & Medicine, a new open access journal launching in September, will be articles that address the physiological and medical implications of exposure to intense or endurance exercise. This research has the potential to maximise the chances of future Olympic athletes to ‘Go for Gold’.

For some children, this chance is denied them before they even reach the age of two. Nutritional insecurity leads to stunted growth and affects physical ability. The Global Hunger Event, to be held on Sunday 12 August, the final day of the Olympics, is a call to arms for the world to take action. The British Prime Minister, David Cameron, and Vice President Michel Temer of Brazil will facilitate discussions between government, business and civil society leaders on this important issue.

It is important to move beyond agricultural strategies focused sharply on short-term yield maximization. We must address issues critical to the long-term sustainability of global food systems and improved human health outcomes.

Agriculture & Food Security aims to help address the challenge of food and nutritional insecurity. Through showcasing innovations in sustainable agriculture in an open access journal, scientists can make their research available to those whose countries it may benefit the most. Diverse challenges and dilemmas are discussed from ‘food price volatility and hunger alleviation’ to the ‘role for scientists in tackling food insecurity and climate change’.

Around one billion people go to bed hungry each night, but The Global Hunger Event is a small step towards the Global Health Assembly’s target to reduce the number of stunted children by 40% by 2025.

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