Breastfeeding and feminism: Reproductive health, rights and justice

2

International Breastfeeding Journal recently published its
first thematic series
on Breastfeeding and feminism: Reproductive health,
rights and justice
, edited by Dr Miriam H Labbok, Dr Paige Hall
Smith and Ms Emily C Taylor.

The
articles in this series focus on nine core discussions held at the third annual Breastfeeding and Feminism Symposia
(2007)
.  Covering diverse
topics ranging from the feminist portrayal of breastfeeding as a “choice”
and women repossessing breastfeeding to breastfeeding in public and the media’s impact on breastfeeding, the series
aims to continue the momentum initiated at the symposia in motivating
involvement in promoting breastfeeding as a woman’s reproductive health, rights
and justice concern. To see all the articles published in this interesting
series please click here, or read the introductory Editorial for more information.

To keep updated on the latest articles published in
International Breastfeeding Journal, please register
for regular alerts.

International
Breastfeeding Journal

encompasses all aspects of the wide-ranging topic of breastfeeding and is
overseen by Editor-in-Chief Lisa Amir and a prestigious Editorial Board
. Please visit the journal’s
About’ page for further information.

Topics:

Health

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Health experts say newborns need to be exclusively breastfed at least until they are six months old. Breast milk contains all the microelements and nutrients that children need during the first months of their lives. These nutrients are extremely important also for further their development, they say.

My wife has done this with both of our children and they rarely get sick and are doing quite well. I believe in breastfeeding, it works.

By the way fresh mother’s milk is even better, per this article. Research has shown that storage of both human milk and artificial baby milk, or infant formula, leads to a loss of ascorbic acid (commonly called Vitamin C).

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