Retrovirology publishes its 1000th article

Retrovirology, currently enjoying its 10th anniversary, saw the publication of its 1000th article this week:

Discovery and full genome characterization of two highly divergent simian immunodeficiency viruses infecting black-and-white colobus monkeys (Colobus guereza) in Kibale National Park, Uganda, by Michael Lauck and colleagues.

Guest blogger, Liam Prestwood from University of Cambridge,  has summarised the key findings by Lauck et al., and the impact that the discovery of the two divergent SIVs will have on primate retroviral research.

At this significant milestone in the journal’s career, we reflect on the excellent  research published in the journal over the last ten years that has brought the journal to where it is now – the leading specialist virology journal. A key indicator of the journal’s success is a measure of how citable  – and consequently how relevant – its publications are, and the journal’s high Impact Factor confirms the importance of all the research published in the journal.  Below are the ten most cited research articles from the journal and demonstrates well the diversity of retroviral research published in the journal.

 

 

This week is also Open Access week, which this year focuses on the impact that open access has had on the world. Retrovirology was one of the first journals published by BioMed Central, and the journal and its Editors have been pioneers for open access.  The articles published in Retrovirology are not only significant to the retroviral research community, but due to the nature of the viruses they focus on, are of huge impact on the everyday lives of millions of people, especially those living with the diseases so many retroviruses cause.

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