BugBitten logoBugBitten began in October 2013 as a blog for the parasite and vector-borne diseases community; hosted by the journal Parasites and Vectors.

The blogs we post highlight and discuss the major developments in our field and provide a forum where expert opinions can be sought and educational advice provided. Many of the posts also aim to be of interest to a wider audience and provide some background information on the topic in question.

We are a small team of regular bloggers assisted by guest posts from the community.  If you wish to blog on a subject in this field you are welcome to get in touch with Hilary Hurd at h.hurd@keele.ac.uk

You can also follow BugBitten on Twitter – @bugbittentweets.


  • Alan Harrison

    Author profile image Alan Harrison completed his doctoral studies at Queen’s University Belfast where he studied the ecology and epidemiology of vector-borne pathogen in multi-host (deer and tick) cycles. He subsequently took up a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Pretoria where he studied a diverse range of topics related to vector-borne pathogen transmission including tick-host interactions, theoretical modelling of tick-borne disease transmission and the identification of novel reservoirs and hosts of vector-borne pathogens. He is currently based at the University of Aberdeen where he is involved in a Wellcome Trust funded collaboration with the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar investigating the biotic and abiotic determinants of zoonotic disease risk in Madagascar.

  • Anja Choon

    Author profile image Anja Choon works for the German Red Cross. Former employers include Nigeria Health Watch and the University of Münster. She holds a PhD in Field Linguistics from the School of Oriental and African Studies.

  • Anouk Gouvras

    Author profile image Anouk is a post-doctoral researcher working in the Parasites & Vectors division of the Natural History Museum (NHM) of London. Currently researching the impact of different treatment strategies on the parasite population genetics of schistosomiasis and on intermediate host snail populations. She is a field-based researcher travelling regularly to Tanzania to collect schistosome samples for the Schistosomiasis Collection at the NHM (SCAN). Particularly passionate about public outreach and engagement with science she blogs, tweets and talks about parasites and neglected tropical diseases.

  • Chris Arme

  • guest post

  • Hilary Hurd

    Author profile image Hilary is Professor of Parasitology Emeritus at Keele University, UK, having retired at the end of 2013. Her research interests have revolved around parasites transmitted by insects and their interactions with their vectors. She was Director of the Centre for Applied Entomology and Parasitology at Keele for over ten years and served as President of the British Society for Parasitology.

  • Julien Pelletier

  • Krisztian Magori

    Author profile image Krisztian is the Assistant Professor of Biostatistics at the Department of Biology at Eastern Washington University. He is a disease ecologist, interested in the complex relationships between hosts, vectors, pathogens, and their biotic and abiotic environment. You can also follow his writing on http://kmagori.weebly.com.

  • Kevin Tyler

    Author profile image Kevin is a founder member of the Parasites and Vectors Advisory Board and a pioneer of open access publishing. At Norwich Medical School, at the University of East Anglia his laboratory focuses on the pathogenicity and virulence of protozoan parasites.

  • Lukus Roberts

  • Srimathy Sriskantharajah

    Author profile image Srimathy Sriskantharajah completed a BSc in Microbiology (UCL) and a PhD in environmental microbiology/ atmospheric chemistry (Royal Holloway University of London) before joining BioMed Central. Srimathy blogs about microbiology, infectious diseases and the environment amongst other things.

  • Torleif Markussen Lunde

    Author profile image Torleif is a Post Doc at Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Norway. His main interest is in the dynamics of malaria transmission, tying together information about weather, the human population, parasites and vectors.

  • Vera Unwin

    Author profile image Vera gained her Bsc (Hons) in Biomedical sciences (University of Dundee), before completing her MSc in Medical Parasitology (LSHTM) and gaining exciting field experience working in the Amazon, Brazil. She is currently based at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, as part of the onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis group.