Veterinary Research goes open access with BioMed Central

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Veterinary Research, ranked number one in the Veterinary Sciences field with an Impact Factor of 3.58, is now accepting submissions for its re-launch as an open access journal in 2011. It will be published by BioMed Central, on behalf of the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA).

Headed by Editor-in-Chief Michel Brémont, Veterinary Research publishes high quality and novel research and review articles focusing on animal infection, and covers the fields of bacteriology, parasitology, virology, immunology, prion diseases, and epidemiology. Further details on the journal’s scope and policies can be found here.

Veterinary Research will be the flagship title in BioMed Central’s expanding publishing programme in this discipline, and we look forward to publishing the first …

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Open Research Computation: an ordinary journal with extraordinary aims

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Guest blog post by Cameron Neylon, Editor-in-Chief of Open Research Computation, which is now accepting submissions.

I spend a lot of my time arguing that many of the problems in the research community are caused by journals. We have too many, they are an ineffective means of communicating the important bits of research, and as a filter they are inefficient and misleading. Today I am very happy to be publicly launching the call for papers for a new journal. How do I reconcile these two statements?

Computation lies at the heart of all modern research. Whether it is the massive scale of LHC data analysis or the use of Excel to graph a small data set. …

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In defence of supplemental data files: don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater

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Since the Journal of Neuroscience, published by the Society for Neuroscience, decided to no longer accept supplementary files with manuscripts, publishing online supplementary material has been the subject of continuing debate in scholarly circles.

BioMed Central takes the opposite stance to the Journal of Neuroscience. Not only do we allow authors to submit supplementary files –  which we at BioMed Central refer to as “additional files”– we positively encourage it, and we continue to look for ways to make the additional data supplied by authors as part of their articles more useful and accessible. Through our Open Data Award, introduced in 2010, we also seek to recognise authors who have shown leadership in sharing the underlying …

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“Chronicity” and Chronic Health Conditions: Implications for Health and Health Care – Call for Papers

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Chronic diseases are those which persist over time.
Recent advances have supported increases in longevity, however many countries
are struggling to find the right balance for health care financing. Chronicity
affects not only the individual with the disease but also their immediate peer
group and has implications for healthcare systems. Exploration into the
concept of chronicity provides an opportunity to critique models of
personal responsibility through to the health systems level and encourages the
conceptualization of alternative health care delivery based on projections of
chronic diseases into the future.    

In 2011, Globalization and Health will be publishing a special issue “Chronicity” and Chronic Health Conditions: Implications for Health and Health Care, and are …

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Beyond the genome and into the cloud

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Next generation sequencing technologies have changed forever the genetics and medical genomics landscape. Advances have been made that were unthinkable just a few years back, but the flip side to these feats is that more data are generated than most regular labs are able to analyze and work with. As the aim of many large-scale genomics projects is to disseminate findings and encourage meta analysis, the conundrum is how to make these data sets accessible. Cloud computing, best described as computation-as-a-service, provides a solution and allows a user to rent hardware and storage for however long they need it, scaling up if and when required.

Following the inaugural Genome Biology conference, ‘Beyond the Genome’ at Harvard Medical School (11th-13th …

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Herpesviridae – a new open access journal, has now launched

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Herpesviridae has today published its first articles with BioMed Central, focusing on increasing overall knowledge of the role of herpes viruses in health and disease.

The ability to establish life-long latency after primary infection is a common denominator for these large species-specific DNA viruses, as is their ability to reactivate during life and cause morbidity and mortality. Herpes viruses are endemic worldwide and many of them are carried by 70-100% of the world’s population.

Recognition of the significance of herpes viruses as potential pathogens has increased during the past three decades due to the escalation in the number of patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy following organ or bone marrow transplantation, as well as to the increasing incidence of AIDS as a result …

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Menopause-associated risk of depression

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There is little doubt that the menopausal transition can be very difficult for some women, and the topic remains of wide interest. It is an area of ongoing research to better understand the biological changes and downstream effects that can occur.  Changes to mental health are often observed, with depression being one of the commonest symptoms experienced during menopause. However, it remains unclear what the underlying causes of this depression are.

In a new commentary in BMC Medicine this week, Claudio Soares discusses the evidence that some women are at an increased risk for depression during menopause as they transition through a “window of vulnerability”. Soares also discusses what is known about the associated risk factors for depression …

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New genomic technique reveals obesity gene variants

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Obesity is highly heritable, but so far genetic association studies have only explained a small fraction of this heritability. Now, in a study published in Genome Biology, researchers have identified DNA variants in two nervous system genes that are associated with an excessively high BMI.

Kelly Frazer and colleagues from UC San Diego, Scripps Translational Science Institute and Sanofi-Aventis have used a new approach that is likely to become popular in searching for hidden heritability: the resequencing of a candidate area of the genome in a large number of individuals followed by screening for genetic markers within this region that are associated with the disease or condition in question. Frazer explains, “We sequenced two intervals encoding the enzymes FAAH …

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BMC Medical Education is now being indexed by Thomson Reuters

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BMC Medical Education has recently been accepted for indexing by Thomson Reuters and is on course to receive its first impact factor in June 2011.  The journal has also been accepted for coverage in Current Contents.  Full details on indexing of all BioMed Central titles is available from our website.

BMC Medical Education publishes articles on a range of topics relating to the training of healthcare professionals, including undergraduate, postgraduate, and continuing education. It has a special focus on curriculum development, evaluations of performance, assessment of training needs and evidence-based medicine.

The journal has just begun operating under an enhanced editorial structure with the appointment of academic Editors to head up different sections of the …

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Exome sequencing reveals second hits in cancer

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A recent article published in Genome Biology by Qi Zhao and colleagues explores the roles of allele specific expression and loss of heterozygosity in the initiation of cancer.

The ‘two hit’ model for malignancy has been the dominant paradigm for tumorigenesis for nearly 40 years, after first being formulated by Alfred Knudson. The hypothesis states that both copies of a tumor suppressor gene need to be inactivated for cancer to be initiated. If one copy of the gene is already mutated, cancer is inevitable if the healthy copy is lost. This loss could occur if the region of the genome containing the healthy copy of the gene is deleted from the genome, an event called loss of heterozygosity. Alternatively, …

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