Aiding recovery from critical illness

- 0 Comments

Guest blog from Christina Jones, winner of
the Medicine Award at the BioMed
Central 5th Annual Research Awards
for her article ‘Intensive care diaries reduce new
onset post traumatic stress disorder following critical illness: a randomised,
controlled trial’

Here, Christina talks about how she became
interested in critical illness recovery and how her research has aided
rehabilitation across the globe

Starting
over 20 years ago I became interested in the struggle patients and their families
had in recovering from a stay in intensive care. Intensive care treats some of
the sickest patients in  hospital, but  little was offered to help to rebuild their
strength and cope with the psychological after matter, such as post traumatic
stress …

Read more

Clinical Proteomics launches with BioMed Central

- 0 Comments

BioMed Central has launched Clinical Proteomics this week, with Dr Daniel Chan as Editor-in-Chief. Previously published by Springer, the journal has joined BioMed Central’s portfolio of open-access titles.

Dr Chan writes in his launch editorial that ‘targeted proteomic diagnostics and therapeutics will be the basis of personalized molecular medicine’, and as such the journal will cover a wide range of topics within the clinical proteomics field, including translational proteomics, and will place special emphasis on the applications of proteomics technology to clinical investigations.

Clinical Proteomics launches with a number of interesting articles, including an article from Mehrani et al. that identifies protein expression signatures for lung damage from the warfare agent Sulfur Mustard. Rukmangadachar et …

Read more

Uncovering the secrets of the human microbiome

- 0 Comments

A diverse range of so-called "friendly" bacteria live within each human body and can be considered an ecosystem in their own right. A new article published in Genome Biology shows that the make-up of this bacterial ecosystem is unique to each individual and that living with someone does not cause your sets of bacteria to become alike.

The study, which was performed by Rob Knight's group at the University of Colorado, also demonstrates that different parts of the body – even your right and left palms – are home to different sets of bacteria and that the bacterial species in your body change on a day-to-day basis. In fact, much as you might expect in an ecosystem, some …

Read more

Splicing and survival – linked in colorectal cancer?

- 0 Comments

New research by Rolf I. Skotheim and colleagues, recently
published in Genome Medicine, provides evidence for the occurrence of aberrant
splicing events in colorectal cancer. Skotheim and colleagues, from Oslo
University Hospital, describe transcriptome instability as a characteristic of
colorectal tumors that is associated with splicing factor expression and,
interestingly, poor patient survival.

Colorectal cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed
cancers and affects both men and women. On the molecular level, the disease
results from the accumulation of genetic alterations that are frequently
brought about by inherent genomic instabilities, such as chromosomal instability
and microsatellite instability. In their study, Skotheim and colleagues sought to determine
whether instability at the mRNA level is also a …

Read more

The health effects of mentholated cigarettes

- 0 Comments

Menthol is an organic compound which is now widely
used in a variety of products due to its anesthetic and counterirritant
qualities. Since the 1920s, menthol has been added to cigarettes and it is
estimated that, approximately one quarter of all cigarettes sold in the United
States today have the descriptor “menthol” on the cigarette pack. Whilst the
health effects of tobacco use and cigarette smoking are well documented, the
health effects of mentholated cigarettes as compared to non-menthol cigarettes
is less well studied.

On
22 June 2009, President Barack Obama signed into law the Family
Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, H.R. 1256
,  a new US federal law giving the Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) the …

Read more

Head direct to BMC Research Notes with research articles

- 0 Comments

Up until now BMC Research Notes has accepted, as direct submissions, short reports, technical notes, data notes, project notes, hypotheses and correspondence articles. Research articles, with their widely-accepted I(B)MRaD (Introduction (Background), Methods, Results and Discussion) format, were not considered unless they were received as a post-peer-review transfer from another journal. The objective of this policy was to avoid restricting authors who felt their article could not fit easily within the I(B)MRaD template. However, in response to feedback from authors and editors and the continued growth of the journal, BMC Research Notes has now …

Read more

On the unbearable lightness of mandatory data sharing

- 0 Comments

Guest
blog by Tommi Nyman (Department
of Biology, University of Eastern Finland), Winner of the Open Data Award
at the BioMed Central 5th
Annual Research Awards

One of the
most pleasant surprises of this spring was that yours truly with coauthors Veli
Vikberg, David R. Smith, and Jean-Luc Boevé received BioMed
Central’s Open Data Award
for our article How common is ecological speciation in plant-feeding
insects? A ‘Higher’ Nematinae perspective’
. (The other highlight was
naturally Finland’s phenomenal victory in the Ice Hockey World Championship Final
last Sunday).

We were  very happy to receive the prize, as we don’t
get awards as frequently as we’d like to! At the …

Read more

Avoiding embarrassment and other harms by preventing the exposure of health data

- 2 Comments

Just imagine how you’d feel if your private – and sometimes very intimate – details of your health were accidentally released on the Internet and your employer, insurer, neighbor and former partners were able to see the medication you’ve taken for mental health reasons or for sexually transmitted diseases.

One way to reduce this risk is to anonymize electronic health record data. A free review in Genome Medicine by Khaled El Emam from the University of Ottawa, Ontario looks at current de-identification methods and suggests best practices.

This is a timely issue because electronic health records are being used more and more in clinically important research and they are likely to be key for some major breakthroughs in the diagnosis …

Read more

31 May 2011: World No Tobacco Day

- 0 Comments

Tobacco
use is an epidemic of global proportions and one of the biggest public health
threats of the 21st Century. According to data from the World
Health Organization
(WHO), tobacco use kills more than 5 million people each
year and is responsible for 1 in 10 adult deaths worldwide. Over the course of the
20th century, tobacco killed over 100 million people and it is
estimated that it could claim the lives of up to 1 billion
people in the 21st century if the present
consumption patterns continue.

As
such, the focus of this year’s World No
Tobacco Day
is on The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco
Control
(WHO FCTC), the
first international public health treaty with …

Read more

Veterinary journals publish new research in National Vaccination Month

- 0 Comments

May 2011 is National Vaccination Month and to further establish BioMed Central as a leading veterinary science publisher, several journals in our portfolio of veterinary journals have recently published important research on vaccination.

BioMed Central’s number of veterinary journals has been rapidly growing, with the existing BMC Veterinary Research and Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica joined by well established and respected journals Veterinary Research and Irish Veterinary Journal earlier this year.

Acquired in January, Veterinary Research, published by INRA and with an Impact Factor of 3.58, has been an exciting addition to the portfolio and this month highlights new research from Dr Courcoul et al. on vaccination effectiveness on Q fever in dairy cattle. Their findings show that …

Read more