March blogs digest: essential tremor, brain awareness, kidneys, tuberculosis, and more

Not had a chance to read all our posts this month? Here’s a roundup of what you’ve missed…

Shaking up the field

March is National Essential Tremor Awareness Month, a neurological movement disorder that causes unintentional shaking movements of the hands and head both when in static positions and during movements. In this guest blog Ariel Levy and Robert Chen, editorial board member for Journal of Clinical Movement Disorders, explained more about the disease.

Quiz: Test your action potential

Brain Awareness Week is a global campaign aiming to increase public awareness of the progress and benefits of brain research and it occurs in March. In light of this, we created a quiz to give you the chance to test how brainy you are! Do you know your hippocampus from your cerebellum?

Why do we age?

Professor Monika Puzianowska-Kuznicka looked at the evidence for a calorie restriction diet improving age-related health issues through epigenetic mechanisms. What everyone wants is to live a long life. However, whilst already living longer, we have realized that longevity is of little value when associated with diseases and disability. Could a caloric restriction of 10% be the answer?

From a precision medicine to glow in the dark sperm

ATCG stethoscopePrecision medicine requires reliable genome sequencing: Identifying the genetic mutations that increase a patient’s disease risk allows them to take action to reduce their chances of developing disease. Research investigated the confidence we have in DNA sequencing results and here the co-author explained more.

Give your kidneys a second thoughtGive your kidneys a second thought this kidney month: The National Kidney Foundation called all individuals to give their kidneys a second thought in March in light of it being National Kidney Month. Critical Care Editorial Board Members and talked here about acute kidney injury, and why this is important to understand.

5149398656_ec327ba69d_oTuberculosis – why an ancient disease is a modern day problem: World TB Day took place in March, aiming to raise awareness about the disease. In recognition of this, BMC Medicine launched a new article collection, highlighting some of the latest findings and debates in TB research.

3822222947_01dc20e029Why neuroscience needs neuroinformatics: a Q+A with Helena Ledmyr: In this blog, Helena Ledmyr told us about her current role at the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility and how neuroinformatics is so fundamental to the progress of brain research.

Untitled design(95)Faced with rejection? Sleep on it: After all the work involved in completing a piece of research, combined with the preparation and effort in submitting a coherent manuscript for peer review, no one wants an email bearing the news: “your manuscript has been declined for publication”. Here, Elizabeth Moylan gave a personal perspective on the next possible steps.

walk-318770_1280Using a virtual reality system to improve balance for those with multiple sclerosis: The Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation published research looking at the use of virtual reality to help patients with multiple sclerosis maintain their balance, a common issue for those with the disease. Co-author Alon Kalron explained more.

woman-1118199_1280Watching television for pregnancy advice – is this beneficial for expectant mothers? Research published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth looked into how the representation of childbirth in the mass media affects childbirth in society, as there is evidence to suggest that it can have a negative effect. Here authors of the research described their work.

Sperm-pre-and-post-NP-luciferase-binding-620x342Why we created glow in the dark magnetic sperm: Publishing in Journal of Nanobiotechnology, researchers used bioluminescent magnetic nanoparticles to allow imaging and manipulation of sperm without damaging the cells. Co-author Keisha Walters talked us through this technique.

 

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