Top CiteULike tags for BioMed Central articles


Tagging (allowing users to assign their own short keywords to items on the web) has taken off through its use on sites such as del.ic.ious (for web bookmarks) and Flickr (for digital photographs). Tagging is also a great fit for scientific research articles, and its use in this way was pioneered by CiteULike, and later Connotea.

BioMed Central is actively
working with the developers behind CiteULike to explore the synergies
between open access and bibliographic tagging. As a small preview
of collaborations to come, CiteULike has created a dynamic tag cloud for
BioMed Central (displayed on the right), which shows the tags that are most actively being used to tag BioMed Central articles. The larger the tag, the more popular it is, and the more articles that have been tagged.

Just click on a particular tag to jump to the CiteULike site and view a list of the BioMed Central articles that have been tagged in that way by CiteULike users. You can then follow further links to explore what other articles those users may have tagged.

If you have any feedback or thoughts on how BioMed Central might best incorporate tagging, get in touch– we’d love to hear from you

View the latest posts on the BioMed Central blog homepage


By commenting, you’re agreeing to follow our community guidelines.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

pedro beltrao

Just for fun a while ago I tried to see if it was possible to extract gene function information from tagged papers (see here).
In the simple example I took all papers tagged with “yeast” and “cell-cycle” from a social bookmarking site and scanned the abstracts for yeast gene names. The majority of the genes found were indeed cell-cycle associated. More than tagging it would be great if authors provided alongside the papers some sort of machinable readable information from their work. In the process of accepting the paper an automatic process could try to add metadata to the paper (like finding the gene names and functional associations) and then the authors would just curate the automatic report. I am certainly not the first to make this wish.